Best SR-22 car insurance companies according to customers

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An SR-22, sometimes written as SR 22 or SR22 Insurance, is a form of financial responsibility required by your state or court for certain high-risk drivers. This form guarantees the driver is maintaining insurance coverage that meets the state's requirements for a specified time. It's generally required after certain types of severe traffic offenses to maintain driving privileges.

Your state may require you to file an SR-22 with the DMV if you've violated any traffic laws or if you've had your license suspended or revoked and you're trying to get it reinstated. It's also common after a DUI or DWI conviction. Unfortunately, SR22 insurance typically leads to significant rate increases, but some car insurance companies offer cheaper coverage than others.

If you're required to provide SR-22 and you don't, your license could be revoked. If you were to get in an accident unlicensed, your auto insurance policy may not honor the terms of your policy.

What is SR-22 insurance?

You've likely heard the term SR-22 insurance if you're required to file an SR22 with your state. While SR-22 insurance is not actually a different type of insurance from typical car insurance, the term is often used to describe car insurance coverage for those who need an SR-22 endorsement because an SR22 affects your car insurance coverage and cost.

If you need SR-22 insurance, it means you need your auto insurance company to file an form with your state to prove you have car insurance because you have violated the law in some way and your state or a court is requiring you file one. This form will help you get back on the road again. It demonstrates you carry a certain amount of bodily injury liability coverage and that your insurance provider also understands a certain risk.

If you need to file an SR-22 form, you’ll then be considered a high-risk or non-standard driver. This can affect your ability to receive car insurance coverage from certain companies. Some insurance companies don't offer SR-22 insurance because they won't insure high-risk drivers and therefore won't file an SR-22 for you. Others just charge you more to legally operate a motor vehicle. The companies in the above table all have a minimum of 25 car insurance reviews on Clearsurance and will file an SR22 for you.

When do I need SR22 insurance?

Proof of insurance with SR-22s is required after you've committed certain violations with the law. You may even be required to have an SR-22 if you've had a series of small violations within a short span of time. You could need SR22 insurance for the following reasons:

  • Conviction for driving under the influence (DUI or DWI)
  • Driving without car insurance
  • Driving with a revoked or suspended license
  • Having repeated traffic violations in a certain amount of time, including speeding tickets
  • Numerous at-fault accidents
  • A fatal at-fault accident or one that results in injuries
  • Reckless or dangerous driving
  • Assignment from a court order
  • Failure to pay fines from tickets
  • Refused consent to breathalyzer or blood alcohol test

Typically, you'll need to file an SR-22 with your state every year for three years. However, some states require it for a longer time period as SR-22 requirements vary by state. Minimum requirements for your coverage can also vary by state.

These eight states don't have SR22 insurance requirements: Delaware, Kentucky, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Pennsylvania. These states may have other requirements and/or forms. If you're facing serious restrictions, make sure to talk to someone at your local DMV to understand exactly what liability insurance is required.

If you move from a state that requires an SR-22 and were required to file one to a state that doesn't require it, you may still need to file the form depending on the laws of the state you're moving from.

How Much Does SR-22 Insurance Cost?

An SR-22 will likely affect your car insurance coverage and cost. The SR-22 form itself may not cost you much, if anything, depending on your state. But your car insurance rates are affected by it. High-risk drivers tend to pay the highest car insurance rates, but the cost of car insurance can vary by company and by state.

There are many other factors that go into the cost of SR-22 insurance such as your age, gender, location, credit score, vehicle type, marital status and so on. Insurance companies also consider the length of time since the incident that made it necessary. If you maintain a clean driving record for a certain period, it will matter less, especially when your state drops the requirement.

Rate data Clearsurance examined shows car insurance rates increase by over $1,200 after a DUI on average. It can be important to shop around after you've had a DUI. You can see the average car insurance rates after a DUI for the 10 largest car insurance companies on our blog.

What Should You Do When Your SR22 Filing Period Ends?

If you haven't noticed, your insurance company typically doesn't check your driving record every cycle. It's expensive and time-consuming, and it can work for or against you. If you don't change insurance companies, they may not notice new accidents. Unfortunately, your auto insurance coverage will also reflect the requirement until you prove it's no longer necessary.

Once the requirement period is complete, you will need to file an SR26 form through your insurance company. An SR-26 form tells your state that you no longer require this extra form. In this case, the SR-26 form is good because it means you've improved your driving record and fulfilled your SR-22 requirements. Once the SR26 is filed, your rates will most likely drop significantly. If you don't see rates drop on your next renewal, you may want to check in whether you have minimum liability coverage or more comprehensive coverage. If you engage in reckless driving or other problematic behavior, your state may keep the requirement in place for much longer.

An SR-26 is used for a few other things as well. However, the other reasons are not good reasons. You may need to file an SR-26 if you or your insurance company cancel your SR22 insurance policy or if you fail to renew your SR22 insurance. Depending on your state's law, consequences for not finishing the required SR-22 filing period could mean you may need to find a new insurance company to complete your SR-22 filing period, or you may need to start the whole process over with a new company.

How Do You Get SR22 Insurance?

To get SR22 insurance, you'll need to contact your car insurance company. An SR-22 can only be obtained through an insurance carrier; you can't complete it on your own. If your auto insurance company offers insurance coverage to drivers who need an SR-22, your company can file the form with your state and offer you car insurance coverage. Depending on your state, you may also be able to submit your SR-22 form by mail or by delivering it in person.

If your company doesn't offer insurance coverage to drivers who need an SR-22, you'll need to switch to a car insurance company that does. Enter your zip code in the filters to see companies offering SR22 insurance in your state.

If you don’t have a car but need your license reinstated, you’ll need non-owner SR-22 insurance. While this is similar to standard SR-22 insurance, the difference is that a non-owner policy only provides liability coverage, but it won’t cover damage to the car you’re driving. That coverage falls under the responsibility of the car’s owner. In order to get a non-owner SR-22 policy, you can’t own a car or have one in your household that you regularly drive.

SR22 Insurance quotes

You can use Clearsurance to get SR-22 insurance quotes. Fill out the filters on this page to view a list of the best companies that offer SR22 insurance in your area. You can sort through companies and find the ones you want to get quotes from. To get quotes, click on the orange “Click for quote” button next to the company, call the number available or visit the company's website.

If you need SR22 insurance, you may want to consider shopping for a new insurance company, even if your current company will insure you with an SR-22. The filing of an SR-22 form will almost always lead to a car insurance rate increase and rates for SR-22 insurance vary by company. You can shop around by requesting car insurance quotes from multiple companies and comparing the quotes to see which company offers you the best coverage for the best price.

SR-22 vs. FR-44

An FR-44 is similar to an SR-22 form but is required in specific instances in certain states. Like the SR-22, the FR-44 is a form of financial responsibility that you may be required to file by your state or the court. It guarantees to your state that you have the required amount of car insurance. Also like an SR-22 form, an FR-44 form must be filed by your car insurance company.

The FR-44 form is only used in Florida and Virginia.

An FR-44 is often called “DUI Insurance” because it's required if you've been convicted of a DUI or DWI. The difference between an FR-44 and an SR-22 is that an FR-44 requires higher liability limits on drivers' car insurance policies than the SR-22 requires.

How car insurance rates are calculated

When searching and comparing car insurance quotes, it can be frustrating trying to understand how your insurance rates are calculated. While there is no exact formula that each car insurance company uses when providing you a quote, there are many factors that do contribute to the price you pay for your insurance. Among the factors that car insurers consider are:

  • Your driving record
  • How much you drive
  • Location
  • Age
  • Marital status
  • Gender
  • Your car's make, model and year
  • Your credit history (in some states)
  • Amount of car insurance coverage (required coverage and optional add-ons, such as collision and comprehensive)

One of the biggest misunderstanding when it comes to insurance rates is that the history of drivers in your area also contributes to how much you pay. For instance, even if you go two years without an accident, if there were a lot of accidents near you recently, your rates might still go up. Why is that the case?

Insurance companies disperse risk across all policyholders so that when it comes time to pay a claim, they have enough money to pay out. But imagine a scenario where they only raised rates for drivers with an accident. For drivers who had an expensive claim, the drivers simply wouldn't be able to afford the raised rates that are based off how much their insurer had to pay after an accident. So instead, insurance companies slightly increase rates across the board to offset the costs, though of course the at-fault driver may see a larger increase.

How much car insurance do I need?

accident or other damage to your car. But at the same time, there's no sense in paying for more coverage than you need, right? So it begs the question: How much car insurance coverage do you actually need?

The answer, as frustrating as it may be, is it depends. For example, someone insuring a brand-new, leased car is likely required to purchase collision and comprehensive coverage , but for someone driving an older car that doesn't have much value, it may not make sense to purchase optional coverage. Plus, states have different car insurance requirements. There are 12 no-fault states that require its drivers to purchase personal injury protection (PIP).

So when it comes to determining what car insurance coverage and limits you should purchase, it's important to do your research. Talk with an insurance agent or your insurance company to determine what makes the most sense for your situation.

How to save money on your car insurance At the end of the day, we'd all like to have the best coverage at a cheap, affordable price. While you never want to sacrifice quality to save a couple of dollars, there are some different ways you can lower your car insurance premium Here are six ways you may be able to lower your car insurance rates:

  • Bundle your car insurance with other policies
  • Consider raising your deductibles
  • Pay your car insurance policy in full
  • Try usage-based car insurance
  • Monitor price changes to your policy
  • Shop for better insurance rates

How we rank car insurance companies

Wondering how Clearsurance determines scores for insurance companies? Our algorithm analyzes a range of inputs from our community of unbiased insurance customers, including:

  • Cost
  • Customer Service
  • Overall Experience
  • Claim service
  • Purchasing experience
  • Likelihood to recommend

Guide to understanding car insurance

Whether you're buying your insurance direct or going through an agent, understanding the different car insurance coverage options is a must. Do you know what is covered by comprehensive coverage? Are you familiar with uninsured motorist coverage? Do you know how a deductible works?

We want to make sure you're equipped with a proper knowledge of car insurance, so check out our practical guide to understanding car insurance . Looking for more educational information about car insurance?

Check out our blog for more information and topics related to car insurance.

How car insurance rates are calculated

When searching and comparing car insurance quotes, it can be frustrating trying to understand how your insurance rates are calculated. While there is no exact formula that each car insurance company uses when providing you a quote, there are many factors that do contribute to the price you pay for your insurance. Among the factors that car insurers consider are:

  • Your driving record
  • How much you drive
  • Location
  • Age
  • Marital status
  • Gender
  • Your car’s make, model and year
  • Your credit history (in some states)
  • Amount of car insurance coverage (required coverage and optional add-ons, such as collision and comprehensive)

One of the biggest misunderstanding when it comes to insurance rates is that the history of drivers in your area also contributes to how much you pay. For instance, even if you go two years without an accident, if there were a lot of accidents near you recently, your rates might still go up. Why is that the case?

Insurance companies disperse risk across all policyholders so that when it comes time to pay a claim, they have enough money to pay out. But imagine a scenario where they only raised rates for drivers with an accident. For drivers who had an expensive claim, the drivers simply wouldn't be able to afford the raised rates that are based off how much their insurer had to pay after an accident. So instead, insurance companies slightly increase rates across the board to offset the costs, though of course the at-fault driver may see a larger increase.

How much car insurance do I need?

You certainly don’t want to be underinsured or uninsured while staring at a claim after a car accident or other damage to your car. But at the same time, there’s no sense in paying for more coverage than you need, right? So it begs the question: How much car insurance coverage do you actually need?

The answer, as frustrating as it may be, is it depends. For example, someone insuring a brand-new, leased car is likely required to purchase collision and comprehensive coverage, but for someone driving an older car that doesn’t have much value, it may not make sense to purchase optional coverage. Plus, states have different car insurance requirements. There are 12 no-fault states that require its drivers to purchase personal injury protection (PIP).

So when it comes to determining what car insurance coverage and limits you should purchase, it’s important to do your research. Talk with an insurance agent or your insurance company to determine what makes the most sense for your situation.

How to save money on your car insurance

At the end of the day, we’d all like to have the best coverage at a cheap, affordable price. While you never want to sacrifice quality to save a couple of dollars, there are some different ways you can lower your car insurance premium.

Here are six ways you may be able to lower your car insurance rates:

  • Bundle your car insurance with other policies
  • Consider raising your deductibles
  • Pay your car insurance policy in full
  • Try usage-based car insurance
  • Monitor price changes to your policy
  • Shop for better insurance rates

How we rank car insurance companies

Wondering how Clearsurance determines scores for insurance companies? Our algorithm analyzes a range of inputs from our community of unbiased insurance customers, including:

  • Cost
  • Customer Service
  • Overall Experience
  • Claim service
  • Purchasing experience
  • Likelihood to recommend

Guide to understanding car insurance

Whether you’re buying your insurance direct or going through an agent, understanding the different car insurance coverage options is a must. Do you know what is covered by comprehensive coverage? Are you familiar with uninsured motorist coverage? Do you know how a deductible works?

We want to make sure you’re equipped with a proper knowledge of car insurance, so check out our practical guide to understanding car insurance. Looking for more educational information about car insurance? Check out our blog for more information and topics related to car insurance.

Save Money by Comparing Insurance Quotes
Compare Free Insurance Quotes Instantly
ZIP Code must be filled out!
 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption